Register for the iXsystems Community to get an ad-free experience and exclusive discounts in our eBay Store.
Resource icon

Multiple network interfaces on a single subnet

Status
Not open for further replies.

kdragon75

FreeNAS Expert
Joined
Aug 7, 2016
Messages
2,390
Thanks
555
#21
So how about when you want to do DHCP on two different networks.
If you maen two different layer two networks like in the case of vlans, the DHCP request broadcast will go out on that layer two network and the corresponding DHCP server will reply. I don't get what your trying to ask.
 

jgreco

Resident Grinch
Moderator
Joined
May 29, 2011
Messages
11,799
Thanks
3,051
#22
Please, change to proper OS with proper network capability.
Its strange that only FreeNAS/FreeBSD can't use mutiple NICs on same subnet.
It doesn't work on pretty much any modern OS, especially any UNIX variant. With the abstraction of network layers, the better answer is to change to a proper network with proper network design.
 

rvassar

FreeNAS Guru
Joined
May 2, 2018
Messages
501
Thanks
155
#23
You may want to re-read this thread.
This is funny because BSD has been the network gold standard for so long and has been used by so many ISPs for core networking for so long...
BSD is very nearly where TCP/IP networking was invented. Yes, there were a several other IP stacks back in the 80's... But BSD was where it was at!

However... ISP core networking was usually the domain of high end Cisco kit, and that derived from the Stanford "Blue Box" multi-protocol router written by Bill Yeager, and basically stolen from Stanford by Lerner & Bosack to start Cisco. They were forced to resign from Stanford, and the resulting scandal was settled in 1987 with a licensing agreement.

http://pdp10.nocrew.org/docs/cisco.html
 

jgreco

Resident Grinch
Moderator
Joined
May 29, 2011
Messages
11,799
Thanks
3,051
#24
BSD is very nearly where TCP/IP networking was invented. Yes, there were a several other IP stacks back in the 80's... But BSD was where it was at!

However... ISP core networking was usually the domain of high end Cisco kit, and that derived from the Stanford "Blue Box" multi-protocol router written by Bill Yeager, and basically stolen from Stanford by Lerner & Bosack to start Cisco. They were forced to resign from Stanford, and the resulting scandal was settled in 1987 with a licensing agreement.

http://pdp10.nocrew.org/docs/cisco.html
I suspect he meant "ISP [...] core networking" as in "every network service at an ISP runs FreeBSD". Which was often true. And still is, for many of us.
 

kdragon75

FreeNAS Expert
Joined
Aug 7, 2016
Messages
2,390
Thanks
555
#25
BSD is very nearly where TCP/IP networking was invented. Yes, there were a several other IP stacks back in the 80's... But BSD was where it was at!

However... ISP core networking was usually the domain of high end Cisco kit, and that derived from the Stanford "Blue Box" multi-protocol router written by Bill Yeager, and basically stolen from Stanford by Lerner & Bosack to start Cisco. They were forced to resign from Stanford, and the resulting scandal was settled in 1987 with a licensing agreement.

http://pdp10.nocrew.org/docs/cisco.html
Thanks for the history lesson. Its always interesting to hear who stole what from who and when:D
 

kdragon75

FreeNAS Expert
Joined
Aug 7, 2016
Messages
2,390
Thanks
555
#26
I suspect he meant "ISP [...] core networking" as in "every network service at an ISP runs FreeBSD". Which was often true. And still is, for many of us.
Yeah this is more or less where I was going. I can't imagine an ISP using a FreeBSD server as a core switch but I have seen stranger things...
 

RegularJoe

FreeNAS Experienced
Joined
Aug 19, 2013
Messages
206
Thanks
4
#27
multiple NIC's on the same subnet and broadcast is just plain ignorant. Yes Windows 10 does this and Mac OS X to some extent. When the OS thinks WIFI is faster for a desktop application it will try to use that gateway. So far letting the OS do that is just plain ignorant and at times a 130mbps WIFI connection sucks compared to a 100mbps wired connection. FreeBSD does it right, maybe you want something like AOE where multiple NIC's send out frames for a storage protocol application. I can see some use for that but then your talking a Storage network.
 

jgreco

Resident Grinch
Moderator
Joined
May 29, 2011
Messages
11,799
Thanks
3,051
#28
Yeah this is more or less where I was going. I can't imagine an ISP using a FreeBSD server as a core switch but I have seen stranger things...
We used to do it all the time. A well-spec'ced FreeBSD box with some of etinc's T1 cards could pound the living !$*&#@*& out of a Cisco 4700M.

https://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-announce/1995-September/000095.html

For many years, it was pretty common for networking gear not to be able to handle line rate. Everybody remembers the horror s***show that were the 7206VXR, capable of about 1Gbps unidirectional routing.

https://community.cisco.com/t5/rout...e-on-router-cisco-7206vxr-npe-g2/td-p/1784439

I actually have, about two meters away from me, one of the earliest widely deployed line-rate routers, an Ascend GRF-400, capable of doing wire speed routing on a full chassis of 100Mbps ports. It used special ASIC's to handle forwarding on each line card, up to around 150K IPv4 routes. It's now my expensive office printer stand (wanna say it was ~$80K new). Its brother is in the closet. They were obsolete pretty quickly, alas.

I still use FreeBSD for a lot of routing in the networks I run. There's no way in hell it will compete with the wire-speed 40Gbps routing some devices here are capable of, but those devices won't do BGP with a full route table, and there's not a lot of good reason to spend megabucks on a massive router if you're in the ~1-10Gbps aggregate range.
 

rvassar

FreeNAS Guru
Joined
May 2, 2018
Messages
501
Thanks
155
#29
We used to do it all the time. A well-spec'ced FreeBSD box with some of etinc's T1 cards could pound the living !$*&#@*& out of a Cisco 4700M.
For TCP/IP absolutely. But the Blue Box was back in the 1980's wild wild west of networking, where everyone had their own technology or protocol and vendor lock in was the rule. So the deal was route TCP/IP, but also a laundry list of others that have since been heaped in the dustbin of history...

(Like X.25, NetWare IPX/SPX, Token Ring with the various AS/400 & Mainframe nightmares, etc... And these are just the popular ones. Disclaimer: I do not know the full protocol list the Blue Box could handle, I'm just pointing out some of the other non-TCP/IP protocols widely in use back then. I'm not sure IPX was even routeable... I was in high school! ;))
 
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Messages
702
Thanks
162
#30

rvassar

FreeNAS Guru
Joined
May 2, 2018
Messages
501
Thanks
155
#31
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top