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List of SSDs with Power Loss Protection

HoneyBadger

Mushroom! Mushroom!
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
2,501
Nope, just had one kill my NUC actually. I mean, MAYBE that's Windows 10's fault, but having the drive come up as unrecognized boot media altogether? It re-imaged just fine. No SMART errors reported...
Pull the temperature stats and look at the peak recorded. Those drives can run toasty under load and will lock up entirely and become unrecognized.
 

AntonyNguyen

Newbie
Joined
Apr 25, 2020
Messages
1
Hey Everyone,

I stumbled upon this thread while looking for PLP-enabled M.2 NVMe drives. It looks like Kingston now sells these and are aimed specifically for use as boot drives, but I'm sure they have more general use cases depending on your performance and durability needs:


I plan on pairing these with the HighPoint bootable RAID controller:

 

HoneyBadger

Mushroom! Mushroom!
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
2,501
Hello Antony. Always nice to have another data point for the PLP-supporting Kingston devices; although as you said, their target market being a "boot drive" doesn't necessarily mean they'll be screaming fast for heavy write usage.

The HighPoint RAID card is interesting - since it has a PLX chip onboard, it wouldn't seem to require support for PCIe bifurcation on the motherboard. Though make sure not to enable any of the "RAID" functionality - just let it pass four devices through and enjoy. (And if you're looking for SLOG performance, using the other two slots for a pair of Optane P4801X cards would probably be a fantastic plan.)
 

devilkin

Neophyte
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
10
Hey Everyone,

I stumbled upon this thread while looking for PLP-enabled M.2 NVMe drives. It looks like Kingston now sells these and are aimed specifically for use as boot drives, but I'm sure they have more general use cases depending on your performance and durability needs:

Is it anywhere certain that these devices are actually proper PLP and not the other crappy sort if implementations that are mentioned in this thread?
 

Octopuss

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
225
Nope, just had one kill my NUC actually. I mean, MAYBE that's Windows 10's fault, but having the drive come up as unrecognized boot media altogether? It re-imaged just fine. No SMART errors reported...
Good I have UPS then :D But I might want one with PLP for the ESXi anyway.
 

HoneyBadger

Mushroom! Mushroom!
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
2,501
Good I have UPS then :D But I might want one with PLP for the ESXi anyway.
You don't need PLP for a vSphere boot device; as long as you redirect scratch and syslog elsewhere, it will run perfectly off of cheap USB sticks.
 

Octopuss

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
225
I have no idea what those things are, and I don't intend to make a home server overcomplicated.
Anyway, with an UPS you don't need any PLP anyway.

Oh and can anyone explain how can a NVMe SSD have such pathetic write speed like the Kingston linked above? 550MB/s or so, what the heck?
Oh wait, the 240GB is not even 300MB/s. That's ridiculous. Who would buy that? That's crap even for a boot drive. I mean it's a SSD, not USB stick.
 

HoneyBadger

Mushroom! Mushroom!
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
2,501
I have no idea what those things are, and I don't intend to make a home server overcomplicated.
Those are both fairly important things in a vSphere configuration, having logs available helps with troubleshooting or monitoring.

Anyway, with an UPS you don't need any PLP anyway.
I'm interested to hear how an external UPS would solve the problem of your PSU suddenly failing. ;)

True end-to-end PLP is also what makes certain drives suitable for use as SLOG devices, since their RAM can be considered non-volatile.

Oh and can anyone explain how can a NVMe SSD have such pathetic write speed like the Kingston linked above? 550MB/s or so, what the heck?
Oh wait, the 240GB is not even 300MB/s. That's ridiculous. Who would buy that? That's crap even for a boot drive. I mean it's a SSD, not USB stick.
It's not designed to be fast on writes - this keeps costs down, and as long as the device still provides good read speeds, users will likely be very happy with it.
 

Octopuss

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
225
Sure it's not meant for performance, but how can it have SO low speed being a NVMe drive? I mean not even close to SATA SSDs for the lower capacity. That escapes me.
 

Yorick

Neophyte Sage
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
Messages
1,472
Do the m.2 intel optanes have full plp support like the 905p and etc or does nothing have full plp support?
I think the idea with Optane is that because there's no DRAM in front of NAND, and every acknowledged write is written through directly, there's no need for PLP circuitry. See https://www.servethehome.com/intel-optane-905p-380gb-m-2-nvme-ssd-review-the-best/2/

A P4801x 100GB is not as fast as the 905p in throughput, but it's durable, the "enterprise DC option", has the same low latency, and costs considerably less than that 905p. That seems like a decent "budget" option, if the board can take a 110mm M.2 and has the cooling for it.
 

HoneyBadger

Mushroom! Mushroom!
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
2,501
Also on the topic of m.2 plp does this thing actually work, is this a thing lol? https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32608501110.html?spm=a2g0o.cart.0.0.3eea3c00iug4H2&mp=1 (Adapter Card to PCI-E x4 Power-off protection for M.2 NGFF MZHPU128HCGM MZHPU512HCGL XP941 SM951 M6E PM951 PM950 PRO SSD)
It's a "thing" in that it will consume power and provide a neat storage of energy that could be catastrophically released. Unfortunately it won't actually impact the ability of the drive to respond any differently to a cache flush request. Short answer, it won't make a non-PLP drive a good candidate for an SLOG.
 

horizonbrave

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
40
Sorry for intrusion:
just wonder if a link to this list has alrady been included in documentation section.
Thanks!
 
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