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FYI, Intel C2000 family of processors: System Fault may lead to dead system.

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#61
Hi

I bought a Supermicro A1SRi-2758F board in the beginning of April, when I got the board I saw that it was revision 1.00.

Being a bit paranoid I'm wondering if this is a fixed board or not, is there any way to determine that?
I forgot to bring up this question with the store when I bought it, but I will also contact them and see what they say.
For all supermicro c2xxx affected with the bug. One can ask supermicro support for an rma even if your system hasnt failed and/or is outside of warranty.
 

rogerh

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#62
For all supermicro c2xxx affected with the bug. One can ask supermicro support for an rma even if your system hasnt failed and/or is outside of warranty.
Does this depend on what region you are in, or who you bought the board from?
 
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#63
Not sure, I just told them that I bought the board from Newegg and I'm staying in Australia.
Their response is

"Please submit a RMA for your MB.

We accept RMA for it even it is out of warranty period.
https://www.supermicro.com/support/rma/ "
 
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rogerh

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#64
Not sure, I just told them that I bought the board from Newegg and I'm staying in Australia.
Their response is

"Please submit a RMA for your MB.

We accept RMA for it even it is out of warranty period.
https://www.supermicro.com/support/rma/ "
Thanks. I'll ask supermicro.nl what they would like to do about my A1SAM-2550F purchased September 2014 and still working up to now. It acts as router and some vital servers so I really don't want it suddenly failing, but I can't justify duplicating it for home use.
 

Ericloewe

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#66
Contact Supermicro and they'll know for sure.
 
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#67
Hi guys,

For Supermicro A1SRi-2758F owners, the official statement it is the seguent:

Supermicro: RMA for platform-level workaround available for concerned customers. We also did confirm that Supermicro has implemented the platform level workaround in products shipped from January 2017 onwards.
Source

I hope that it can be help you.
 
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#68
My Asrock board failed last week , but who knows if asrock has already implemented a workaround? I think I have to switch to anther platform.... . I don't like how Intel informs his customers about a solution... this does not make anything better if there're saying nothing...
 

Ericloewe

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#69

m0nkey_

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#70
My Asrock board failed last week , but who knows if asrock has already implemented a workaround?
Open an advanced RMA with ASRock Rack, they'll send you a new board with the fix and swap it out.
 
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#71
sharky said:
but who knows if asrock has already implemented a workaround?
For the ASRock, the official statement it is the seguent:

  • ASRock Rack: Not seeing major issues from customers yet. Working with a vendor on this issue. Current course of action is to replace boards under three-year warranty.
Source

If your mainboard is covered by warranty, you can require the sobstitution. If isn't covered by warranty, i think you will have to buy another mainboard.
 
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Ericloewe

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#72
Try to RMA even it it's out of warranty. They'll probably replace it in this case.
 
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#73
For supermicro boards- i've received my repaired board after 2 weeks of sending over to supermicro taiwan. They also updated the firmwares and bios.
 

Ericloewe

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#74
For supermicro boards- i've received my repaired board after 2 weeks of sending over to supermicro taiwan. They also updated the firmwares and bios.
It's almost certainly a new board. Replacing the SoC is pretty damn hard without ruining half the board and quality of the process would be atrocious.

They might try it anyway and sell them off as refurbished - the ones that survive the process and pass QC, at least. But I don't expect it to be cost-effective. The SoC is by far the most expensive part on the board. Next are the BMC, NICs, rear panel connectors, heat sink, other connectors and EEPROM devices. Buying a new SoC to stick it in an old board of little value makes no sense if you can place it on a shiny new board.
 
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#75
It's almost certainly a new board. Replacing the SoC is pretty damn hard without ruining half the board and quality of the process would be atrocious.

They might try it anyway and sell them off as refurbished - the ones that survive the process and pass QC, at least. But I don't expect it to be cost-effective. The SoC is by far the most expensive part on the board. Next are the BMC, NICs, rear panel connectors, heat sink, other connectors and EEPROM devices. Buying a new SoC to stick it in an old board of little value makes no sense if you can place it on a shiny new board.
Not sure if it's a new board or something but one thing is for sure they maintained the s/n. I wasnt able to thoroughly inspect the before and after board. Anyway, i'm happy with the peace of mind that my board will not be a ticking timebomb. :)
 

Chris Moore

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#76
It's almost certainly a new board. Replacing the SoC is pretty damn hard without ruining half the board and quality of the process would be atrocious.

They might try it anyway and sell them off as refurbished - the ones that survive the process and pass QC, at least. But I don't expect it to be cost-effective. The SoC is by far the most expensive part on the board. Next are the BMC, NICs, rear panel connectors, heat sink, other connectors and EEPROM devices. Buying a new SoC to stick it in an old board of little value makes no sense if you can place it on a shiny new board.
Actually, you are thinking about it backwards. The fabrication facility can easily replace the chip and do it so well that you can't tell it from a new board. For them, it would not make sense to give you all the new components you listed, on a shiny new board, when they are equipped to fix the problem with just a chip swap.
I have done warranty work for almost all the big companies over the years; IBM, NEC, Compaq, Hewlett-Packard; none of them were giving out new boards if they could find and fix the old one. You might be given an exchange part, one that was previously repaired, but very few repair parts are new parts.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

Chris Moore

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#77
When I first started in the computer biz, I worked the first ten years as a repair technician. I have done board rework, a long time ago.

I know that the popular logic is to throw it away and buy a new one, but there are still people out there repairing things.

Here is a video of that type of work being done: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeifR-z92pI
 

Ericloewe

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#78
The main problem here is that the process does not scale to an industrial operation that can fix most Avoton boards out in the wild. Yes, it can be done, but not at the required scale while maintaining quality - at least without investing basically as much as you would on a production line.
 

Chris Moore

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#79
The main problem here is that the process does not scale to an industrial operation that can fix most Avoton boards out in the wild. Yes, it can be done, but not at the required scale while maintaining quality - at least without investing basically as much as you would on a production line.
The company that made the board already has a production line. They also already have rework stations because they test the boards at the factory and repair ones that didn't get made perfectly. It is part of the production process. Manufacturers have been repairing boards for as long as they have been making them. They already know how and have the equipment.
 

Stux

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#80
I still wonder what the actual fix is
 
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