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ESXi 7.0.b UEFI

Jacoub

Neophyte
Joined
Sep 4, 2020
Messages
4
Tried loading TrueNAS 12 beta 2 &2.1 on SuperMicro Dual E-2690 v3 CPU running ESXi 7.0b in UEFI mode. the installation went smooth but the VM will never boot. if i will assign 32 cores to the VM it will run smooth
in Legacy BIOS mode VM loads on 4 core
any suggestions
 

Evertb1

Senior Member
Joined
May 31, 2016
Messages
540
I haven't time to verify it but I seem to recall that the Bios firmware is default on the VM's. You should be able to edit the .vmx file of that VM to enable UEFI. Open the .vmx file with an editor an add a line like:
Code:
firmware = "efi"

I am running ESXi 7.0 with a TrueNAS 12 beta VM as well and did not experience this problem. So I am not 100% sure this is the solution. But I have read something about it somewhere. Altering the .vmx file is not difficult so it's worth a shot. You can always change it back. If you don't know how to open and edit the.vmx file you can always download a tool like vmtweaker. Never used it but it seems to do the trick.

Edit: The FreeNAS forum has a "FreeNAS & Third-part Software" sub-forum. There is a section there dedicated to Hypervisors like VMware. If you are not able to solve this you might try your luck there.
 
Last edited:

Jacoub

Neophyte
Joined
Sep 4, 2020
Messages
4
thanks for your reply. I can install in both modes UEFI & BIOS but I have to specify "EFI or BIOS while creating the VM". But if chose EFI Boot in the VM & in order that UEFI VM to boot I have to assign a high core count like 32 Cores or above. While if I created a Legacy BIOS boot VM I can boot with 4 Cores.
The question is not how to boot EFI or BIOS since I'm experienced on this the issue is EFI VM requires 32 cores which I find strange
I hope I was able to explain myself.
 

jgreco

Resident Grinch
Moderator
Joined
May 29, 2011
Messages
12,828
in order that UEFI VM to boot I have to assign a high core count like 32 Cores or above. While if I created a Legacy BIOS boot VM I can boot with 4 Cores.
The question is not how to boot EFI or BIOS since I'm experienced on this the issue is EFI VM requires 32 cores which I find strange
So if you do "Thing A," which almost everyone does, it runs with 4 cores.

And if you do "Thing B," which almost nobody does, it needs 32 cores.

If you're "experienced on this issue," then why is there even a question here?

Virtualizing FreeNAS is not going to work 100% with any random settings you decide to pick. You actually do need to use compatible settings....
 

JFisher

Neophyte
Joined
Dec 2, 2016
Messages
4
I experienced the same thing attempting to boot FreeNAS 12 on VMWare with UEFI, while the same settings worked fine booting FreeNAS 11. I tried both VMWare 6.7 and 7.0. I also tried taking a working FreeNAS 11 and upgrading to 12 which would result in an unbootable state. Not sure what the deal was but definitely something that wasn't an issue before.
 

Ericloewe

Not-very-passive-but-aggressive
Moderator
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
16,721
Can you be more specific? I'm not sure I've seen a failure mode described in this thread. Does the boot process seemingly hang (if so, can you try the serial console to see if it's just the virtual VGA? )? Do you get an error message? And adding cores magically resolves the issue?
 

JFisher

Neophyte
Joined
Dec 2, 2016
Messages
4
I'd have to rebuild the VM and try it again, at the moment I've switched back to a bare metal install for testing. From what I recall of the behavior the boot sequence would barely get started before the VM would just error and shut down.
 

vangoose

Neophyte
Joined
Aug 31, 2020
Messages
4
I experienced the same thing attempting to boot FreeNAS 12 on VMWare with UEFI, while the same settings worked fine booting FreeNAS 11. I tried both VMWare 6.7 and 7.0. I also tried taking a working FreeNAS 11 and upgrading to 12 which would result in an unbootable state. Not sure what the deal was but definitely something that wasn't an issue before.
If you select FreeBSD 12 as the guest OS, it will automatically set it to BIOS, and there is a reason for it, right?
 

Jacoub

Neophyte
Joined
Sep 4, 2020
Messages
4
If you select FreeBSD 12 as the guest OS, it will automatically set it to BIOS, and there is a reason for it, right?
But you can still boot UEFI on bare metal hence the fact it defaults to BIOS is irrelevant. As far as I know it is a FreeBSD issue & I tried ESXI 7.0 U1 Beta with TrueNAS 12 RC1 still same issue
 
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