Register for the iXsystems Community to get an ad-free experience and exclusive discounts in our eBay Store.

BUILD 1st FreeNAS Build

Status
Not open for further replies.

Chris Authier

Neophyte
Joined
May 3, 2016
Messages
4
I am looking to build a FreeNAS storage box for Veeam backups and long term archive.
This will be for large files / old VM's / raw video footage.

I am looking for confirmation on the build hardware compatibility. Thanks.


Motherboard:
Intel S2600CP4 Server Mainboard (QUAD NIC)
Drive Interface:
Intel® Integrated RAID Module RMS3JC080
CPU:
Dual Intel Xeon E5-2609v2
RAM:
Kingston 32GB (8GB x 4) ECC Server Memory
Storage:
12 x HGST 8TB Helium Ultrastar Nearline SAS 12Gb/s 7200RPM 128MB Cache (HE8)(H4K)
Enclosure:
AIC 4U 19" 24 x 3.5" hot swap + 2 x 2.5" hot swap drive bays Storage Rackmount Chassis w/ 3 x 12025 fans, Single Expander 12G mini-SAS (8643) BP, full height PCI slots, w/ 1200W 80+ Platinum PMBUS HRP 1+1 RPS, w/o Door, w/ 28" tool-less slide rail

FreeNAS OS
 

Dice

Neophyte Sage
Joined
Dec 11, 2015
Messages
1,206
I've no idea if the Veaam backup requires any particular hardcore performance, I suspect it doesn't?
If so, this is a super overkill build for its purpose. Which - might be anything and everything in the scope between a 'mistake' to 'aware of the overkill' - but at least something to be aware of while making an informed decision regrading hardware. Before getting to deep in that initial interpretation, further information regarding the user scenario would be useful.
There is one thing that stand out to me (others may object to other aspects of the build), that is your:
The big caveat here is the 'raid', in which "jbod mode" might not be sufficient for the best FreeNAS experience. There are stickies regarding this particular aspect, that might be useful to read (again?).

Cheers /
 
Last edited:

Chris Authier

Neophyte
Joined
May 3, 2016
Messages
4
I've no idea if the Veaam backup requires any particular hardcore performance, I suspect it doesn't?
If so, this is a super overkill build for its purpose. Which - might be anything and everything in the scope between a 'mistake' to 'aware of the overkill' - but at least something to be aware of while making an informed decision regrading hardware. Before getting to deep in that initial interpretation, further information regarding the user scenario would be useful.
There is one thing that stand out to me (others may object to other aspects of the build), that is your:

The big caveat here is the 'raid', in which "jbod mode" might not be sufficient for the best FreeNAS experience. There are stickies regarding this particular aspect, that might be useful to read (again?).

Cheers / Dice
Thanks for the input!

Yes it is overkill, I don't buy cheap components.
This was a config quoted by a local vendor.
I am waiting on a quote from another vendor who is going the SuperMicro route. I will post that config when I get it.

I also have a quote on a "certified" FreeNAS system from iXsystems.

Chris
 

joeschmuck

Old Man
Moderator
Joined
May 28, 2011
Messages
8,571
Yes, this is super overkill. What are your requirements, and I mean availability, throughput, redundancy, maximum expected storage capacity? It sounds like this will be an office system vice a home system. Also what are you setting aside for maintenance costs and are you planning to buy a maintenance contract or maybe some spare parts, and are you doing all the maintenance too? Yea, lots of questions.

Yes it is overkill, I don't buy cheap components.
Naw, it's not a factor of cheap components.

Also I guess I'm wondering why you are asking about this system setup as if you were building it when it was provided by another vendor whom I would assume would warranty the compatibility. Yea, that system is way overkill and you don't need to spend that kind of money on a system for simple storage. And those hard drives, those can't be cheap. I guess I could ask my Ex (she works for HGST) for some discount drives but they may be filled with C4 vice Helium.

And I too question the RAID card, I don't believe it's compatible with FreeNAS, but it may be fine as a hardware RAID controller but FreeNAS MUST use a software RAID to properly work so the person giving this quote has no idea about FreeNAS I suspect.

If you want to get a solution where you don't need to do anything, buy a pre-built system from iXsystems (like you said you were waiting on a quote from). Heck, tell me what your requirements are and I'll sell you my old AMD system, that thing works great but if you need a ton of drives, that would require some add-on cards.
 

Dice

Neophyte Sage
Joined
Dec 11, 2015
Messages
1,206

ALFA

Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2014
Messages
53
There is something that doesn't fell right in this build and I have to ask:

this MOBO -> Intel-Server-Board-S2600CP4 (its where the links send me, if is the wrong link then my deepest apologies)

Anyway, this card have 4x1 1Gb Ethernet ports, and you are using 12Gb/s SAS3 HDD, why? beside with this another card -> RAID Module RMS3JC080 you only can connect 8 of 12 HDD at 12GB/s, because I doubt that the 8 Integrated SAS Ports (on the S2600CP4) can't go more than SAS2. So better go with the SAS2 Version 6Gb/s HDD (or even you can go with the SATA version, much cheaper for the same speed), or you will need to find a 10 Gb LAN card, or change to another MOBO with 10Gb Ethernet ports, or change everything.

This only will work if your another machine, have a similar hardware (SAS3 HDDs, etc) and you can move over a 10 Gb Network
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
217
If you are looking for just an archive system you could get away with a http://www.supermicro.com/products/motherboard/Atom/X10/A1SRM-2758F.cfm

Should be plenty of power for an archive system. Throw 16/32 gigs of ram and a LSI 9207, or what ever your preferred LSI HBA card is, and you should be able to connect all 12 drives with decent performance and at very low power.

Would save you a huge chunk of change and perform similarly it would seem.
 

danb35

Wizened Sage
Joined
Aug 16, 2011
Messages
11,420
A couple of issues with the A1SRM-2758F:
  • For NAS use, the 2750 is preferred over the 2758
  • The board (like any of the Avoton boards) is awfully expensive for what you get. That's a $400 mobo/CPU. For that same price, you could get an X10SL7-F board, an i3-4160, have $30 left over, and get better performance too. And on top of that, you'll already have your SAS HBA built in to the board. It'll save you at least $100 compared to the Avoton board. IMO, the Avoton boards only make sense when maximum performance per watt is essential.
@Chris Authier, the requirements you indicate would be easily served by much lower-end hardware. This isn't a matter of cheap vs. good quality; it's more a matter of not overbuying just for the sake of doing so. Nothing you mention calls for dual E5s. Really, nothing you mention even calls for a single E5, though if you anticipate needing more than 32 GB of RAM, you'd need an E5 to support it (and in that case, you should check out the E5-2670--they're dirt cheap right now and would outperform the 2609s you mention). Yes, I have dual E5s. Yes, they're complete overkill for my use case.

Your system is going to be network-limited in any event. Throwing faster drives and CPU at is, if anything, just going to give you a bigger queue of data waiting to leave (or enter) the server.
 

Ericloewe

Not-very-passive-but-aggressive
Moderator
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
16,654
@Chris Authier, the requirements you indicate would be easily served by much lower-end hardware. This isn't a matter of cheap vs. good quality; it's more a matter of not overbuying just for the sake of doing so. Nothing you mention calls for dual E5s. Really, nothing you mention even calls for a single E5, though if you anticipate needing more than 32 GB of RAM, you'd need an E5 to support it (and in that case, you should check out the E5-2670--they're dirt cheap right now and would outperform the 2609s you mention). Yes, I have dual E5s. Yes, they're complete overkill for my use case.
A Skylake system would support 64GB, so Xeon E5 is only a necessity for more than 64GB (or Xeon-D, but pricing is not favorable).
 

Chris Authier

Neophyte
Joined
May 3, 2016
Messages
4
I really appreciate all you comments here!
It looks to me like I am being oversold.

Here is the iXsystems config:

FreeNAS 4U Unified Storage Appliance: 24 x 3.5" SAS (up to 192TB RAW Capacity) Dual Expanders – 32GB RAM (Upgradable to 128GB RAM) - Write Cache Optional + Up to 400GB MLC High-Performance Read Cache (Optional) – 4 x 1GbE Ethernet Standard – Redundant Power Supply --- NFS, CIFS, HTTP, FTP, iSCSI, AFP, Encryption, Snapshots, Compression, RAID, Dual/Triple-parity RAID, Triple-mirroring, Shadow Migration, Cloning, Remote Replication
Motherboard: SuperMicro X9DR7-LN4F
HBA: LSI 9207-8i
CPU: 2 x Intel Four Core 2.50Ghz Xeon 10MB cache 6.4 GT/s QPI (80W) (E5-2609v2)
RAM: 4GB DDR3 1600Mhz ECC/REG (32GB Total)
Disk Drives: HGST 8TB Helium Ultrastar Nearline SAS 12Gb/s 7200RPM 128MB Cache (HE8)(H4K)
 

Chris Authier

Neophyte
Joined
May 3, 2016
Messages
4
What I am really looking for is a "current" system that will give me 5 - 7 years of good solid service.
I want reliable - server quality components.
I don't need super high performance but at the same time I am transferring TB's of data. I don't want it to take all day.
I want 24 bays, 12 populated and 12 for future expansion. I have the rack-space.
I want the components to be FreeNAS compatible.

I think the LSI 9207-8i is the HBA I want.
What are your recommendations for Chasis, MB, CPU?

Thanks for you input.
 

joeschmuck

Old Man
Moderator
Joined
May 28, 2011
Messages
8,571
Wow! I feel even the iXsystems configuration is a bit steep for just a simple storage system.

When you say you will be transferring TB's of data, I guess I'm at a loss as to how much data you plan to transfer in a normal day, or if you are stating that you need to transfer all your data onto the machine initially and that is a huge amount of data. I ask because if you are looking to transfer TB's of data every day, what kind of networking are you going to use?

As for what components you really need and that will give you reliable service for 5-7 years, while you cannot rule out infant mortality, I agree with using a current Supermicro single CPU solution, and there are a few different ways you could go. Here's the trick with long compatibility... If you are not exposing your FreeNAS system to the internet then you could just retain the current FreeNAS software and it's compatible. Of course I would think your hardware would be compatible for many years to come since it's based on FreeBSD but that is a risk you would take no matter which system you purchased. @danb35 already gave you a great recommendation for the motherboard and CPU, I'd stick 16GB RAM into it as that would basically double what you would need and if you find out later that you are using FreeNAS for much more that you originally expected, then you could add more RAM. Also that Supermicro board can handle 12 hard drives on it's own so you could save yourself some money up front and not purchase that SAS card right now, but then again, if you really just want to make a one time purchase, well that is up to you of course. As for hard drives, I would not use 7200 RPM drives at all, they offer you zero benefit for the system you are building and only create heat and suck power.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top